Kennedy and King

Kennedy and King

The President, the Pastor, and the Battle Over Civil Rights

Book - 2017
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"The story of civil rights in the early 1960s is a tale of courageous sit-ins and marches, police brutality, violence, and murder. It is also a tale of two men: John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr., a pair of gifted, charismatic, and ambitious leaders from strikingly different worlds. When they first met in 1960, as Kennedy lobbied King to back his bid for the presidency, the wealthy Irish Catholic and the Southern Baptist preacher had little natural rapport. Kennedy was cool and witty, King taut and high-minded. Kennedy was slow to embrace a full-throated position on equality for black Americans, fearing the wrath of southern Democrats. Over the next three years--as America was transfixed by a series of dramatic demonstrations across the South--it was King, more than any other figure, who led Kennedy to finally make a moral commitment to civil rights; and it was Kennedy's hesitation that prompted King to achieve his greatest potential as an activist. This unique and transformative relationship has never been explored in such gripping fashion. From Harry Belafonte's Manhattan apartment to the Birmingham city jail to Joseph Kennedy's Palm Beach estate, [this book] delivers a narrative both public and intimate: the risky strategies, secret meetings, outrageous personalities, and private struggles that absorbed the lives of these two men--and forever bound them together."--Jacket.
Publisher: New York : Hachette Books, 2017
Edition: First edition
Copyright Date: ©2017
ISBN: 9780316267397
0316267392
Branch Call Number: 973.922 L5788K 2017
Characteristics: xi, 511 pages, 8 pages of unnumbered plates : illustrations ; 24 cm

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m
memoral
Jul 28, 2017

Outstanding history of the beginnings of the Civil Rights movement. JFK comes off as the calculating politician at first but events on the streets and his home life allow him to see the light. MLK's soul searching as to how to proceed gives him the strength and perseverance to carry on.

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StarGladiator
Jun 13, 2017

Sounds like a mighty interesting book, and I look forward to reading it. [It was JFK who first coined the phrase, // affirmative action \\ and dispatched US Marshals to protect James Meredith during the horrendously tumultuous time the University of Mississippi was being de-segregated or integrated, the FBI was supposed to also be on site, but they somehow managed to disappear].
Interesting to note that on the day President Kennedy was murdered, the following once worked at the same FBI/SIS unit during WWII: Cartha Deloach [FBI on 11/22/63, and Deloach's cousin was a doctor at Parkland who would later order the administering of electroshock treatments to George DeMohrenschildt shortly before his suicide], J. Walton Moore [CIA man stationed in Dallas on 11/22/63], William Harvey [CIA station chief in Italy, the site whose cables were intercepted by Pfc. Dinkin, detailing the upcoming assassination], J. Gordon Shanklin [FBI SAIC stationed in Dallas on 11/22/63], Guy Banister [CIA paymaster in New Orleans on 11/22/63].
Equally interesting is that a manager of that same FBI/SIS unit during WWII was Frank Holloman, who on 1968 in Memphis, TN, when Rev. King was murdered, was a retired FBI agent who was the Police and Fire Director in Memphis.

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