Hex

Hex

Book - 2016
Average Rating:
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"Welcome to Black Spring, the seemingly picturesque Hudson Valley town haunted by the Black Rock Witch, a seventeenth-century woman whose eyes and mouth are sewn shut. Muzzled, she walks the streets and enters homes at will. She stands next to children's beds for nights on end. Everybody knows that her eyes may never be opened or the consequences will be too terrible to bear. The elders of Black Spring have virtually quarantined the town by using high-tech surveillance to prevent their curse from spreading. Frustrated by being kept in lockdown, the town's teenagers, decide to break their strict regulations and go viral with the haunting. But, in so doing, they send the town spiraling into dark, medieval practices of the distant past."--Jacket.
Publisher: New York : Tor, 2016
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780765378804
0765378809
Branch Call Number: F OLDEH-T
Characteristics: 384 pages ; 25 cm
Additional Contributors: Forest-Flier, Nancy - Translator

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KateHillier Jul 03, 2017

That was a harrowing thing to read and certainly the creepiest piece of fiction I've read in recent memory. The premise sounds a bit bizarre, comical perhaps more than creepy. A town, back in the day, executed a woman as a witch. In present day she still hangs around, appearing around town somewhat randomly but following a certain pattern. The rules in place to deal with her, and to keep people from every wanting to cut the stitching that keeps her eyes and mouth shut, has also been around for centuries. Kids get curious, fear gets the best of people, it all sounds so painfully normal but like any good horror story worth its salt that's exactly where it gets scary. It gets dark and creepy and you honestly are dragged along through the muck. I had a blast reading it. Definitely check it out, then sleep with your lights on.

j
jessicalynn113
Mar 24, 2017

I just couldn't get into the book. It was VERY VERY slow. I am all for horror novels and paranormal but this book took too long to get to anything good. I felt like the first 8 chapters overloaded the reader with so much historical information and so many characters it became difficult to sort them out.

ckouvelas Feb 19, 2017

Great horror with a twist. Was drawn out it some areas however I was marvelled how technology was utilised within the story.

bandblair Feb 06, 2017

I was fascinated by this book! I just didn't like some of the middle parts; I found they dragged on.

DBRL_ANNEG Feb 01, 2017

This is a fabulous horror novel, but it's not a story that will scare you with creepy things that go bump in the night. Instead it's a fascinating look at the horrors communities can collectively bring upon themselves when taking judgment into their own hands. It is easy to think that witch hunts are a thing of the past, something our superstitious ancestors held onto, but which we are far too "advanced" to fall prey to. Thomas Olde Heuvelt expertly shows how this isn't the case, with a story that explores the unraveling of a modern town that has long been bound by an old terror.

I highly recommend this book, even for people who don't normally read horror.

s
stellabay
Jun 27, 2016

I read it based on Stephen King's recommendation on Twitter. Definitely a different take on a horror story. I liked it but was a bit indifferent about it as well. But would recommend it.

s
Sarah1984
Jun 20, 2016

This review may contain spoilers

6/6 - First of all: those damn kids, and why did it have to be the dog?!

20/6 - Finally getting around to finishing this review! I've been binge reading romance since I finished this and having internet problems that have left me feeling no desire to write, but now I have a huge backlog of reviews to write which are hanging over my head and every time I read I think about the fact that I'm probably forgetting more and more of the books I haven't written about.

Hex was one of those books where you're not sure where the scare, the evil is going to come from. To start with I thought it would be the expected scare - the idea of a 17th century witch who is allowed to walk through town, can't be contained or touched and must have her eyes and mouth kept sewn shut to prevent her evil from spilling out is pretty horrifying - but then at about the halfway point the terror of mob mentality began to show through - the idea of a town allowing three of its teenagers to be publicly whipped and those who weren't onboard feeling like they had to be onboard or face a similar fate is almost as bad. The atmosphere in the town reminded me of Nazi Germany (I'm also reading Schindler's Ark at the moment) or Stalinist Soviet Union with the constant surveillance and the way neighbour was encouraged to dob in neighbour to further keep control of the town. Sure, it started out as a protective measure for the townspeople's own good, but as soon as there was a problem it quickly deteriorated into chaos.

BIG SPOILER TO FOLLOW

I liked the geographical move that happened with the translation into English. Reading Heuvelt's explanation at http://torforgeblog.com/2016/04/04/am... really made me think that the story and the horror would have been lost in translation if he hadn't rewritten it for English speaking audiences. The one thing I would like to know is how the original book ended, because this ending was a pretty bleak 'no one survives' kind of ending (not that I didn't enjoy that, I would just be interested to see how he wrote it the first time around).

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ckouvelas Feb 19, 2017

ckouvelas thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

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