Wolf Hollow

Wolf Hollow

Book - 2016
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"Twelve-year-old Annabelle must learn to stand up for what's right in the face of a manipulative and violent new bully who targets people Annabelle cares about, including a homeless World War I veteran"-- Provided by publisher.
Publisher: New York, NY : Dutton Children's Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC, [2016]
Copyright Date: ©2016
ISBN: 9781101994825
1101994827
Branch Call Number: JF WOLK-L
Characteristics: 291 pages ; 22 cm

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Newbery Medal

The Newbery Medal is awarded annually to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. Check out all of Tacoma Public Library's Newbery winner and honor books. 2017 Medal Winner The Girl Who Drank the Moon 2017 Honor Books Freedom Over Me The Inquisitor's Tale, Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog Wolf Hollow (more)

And The Winners Are…

Forget the Golden Globes and the Oscars, Tacoma Public Library’s favorite award show of the year is the American Library Association’s (ALA) Youth Media Awards!  Every year ALA honors the best books, videos, and audiobooks for children and young adults with notable awards such as the Newbery, Caldecott, Printz, Coretta Scott King, and many more! And the 2017 winners are: John Newbery Medal … (more)


From Library Staff

Twelve-year-old Annabelle must learn to stand up for what's right in the face of a manipulative and violent new bully who targets people Annabelle cares about, including a homeless World War I veteran.

Earning some of the best reviews of the year, Wolf Hollow has garnered comparisons to To Kill a Mockingbird for addressing issues of injustice and inequality, but in terms of social status instead of racism. By tackling themes of bullying, injustice, and the uncertainty of a country on the tail e... Read More »


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rtalps Oct 11, 2017

An excellently written book about standing up for what you believe in and the nature of forgiveness. Wolk has a beautiful way of setting the scene in this quiet but powerful book.

g
guantina
Jun 26, 2017

I loved this book! It had an interesting storyline throughout, while also touching upon dark and serious matters during the war. Annabelle is a strong and selfless character who proves over and over again to be a resilient individual. Along with other unique characters, the author created a very powerful story which left me with a haunting feeling.

LPL_LaurenT Apr 21, 2017

Haunting and vivid, you’ll feel like you’ve fallen into 1940s Pennsylvania within sentences of starting Wolf Hollow. Protagonist Annabelle’s peaceful town of Wolf Hollow is sent into a tailspin when Betty Glengarry moves to town. Annabelle falls prey to Betty’s mean streak and as one act of bullying is followed by escalating cruelty, Annabelle knows she has to take a stand. Betty targets Toby, a WWI veteran, as her scapegoat, but Annabelle knows Toby’s kindness, and she refuses to let Betty to heap her crimes upon strange, quiet Toby. Annabelle’s world is well-formed and beautifully described. Her heart and pluck immediately put her on the level of other literary heroines, and this book has widely been described by book critics as an “instant classic” and “reminiscent of To Kill a Mockingbird.” There’s a considerable about of hype, but Wolf Hollow lives up to it.

t
ttmagin
Apr 17, 2017

A book about bullying and lies. Interesting but deep. A middle school book for grades 6-8.

b
Bell_Fleck
Feb 24, 2017

While I agree with the other comments listed here that the book is very well-written and deals with serious issues that do need to be discussed, I think there's a huge need to consider the impact of the book on its intended readership. I'm assuming the book is intended for middle school age as young as 11 or 12 as that's the age of its protagonist, Annabelle. While I value the abilities of twelve year-olds to engage difficult issues, I will nonetheless assert here that twelve year olds are still developing a lot cognitively and emotionally. Therefore they need guidance and affirmation when encountering content like that which is found in Wolf Hollow. I think Wolf Hollow fails to be sensitive enough to this reality. Unless this book is read in classrooms, it will be read independently by young people who pull it off the shelf. If these children are like me, they will not think nor want to share their thoughts on the book with their parents or other adults, not as a general rule. They'll consume it and return it to the library. I think the gravity of this book's contents make this independent reading of the book a serious problem. The motif of the disappearance of a young girl and the possibility of her kidnap, murder, (and possible rape?), is an extremely grave one. It is a really scary and complex situation to consider emotionally and thus equally complex to think through. I think it is very possible young readers may read this independently and get stuck at the emotional effect of the story and not have the tools to think through it and, therefore, be able to lay it aside. I do not think Lauren Wolk writes Wolf Hollow in a way that satisfactorily facilitates this cognitive process for the age group for which the book is intended.

SquamishLibraryStaff Feb 21, 2017

Very worthy to be a Newbery short-list title. It's beautifully written and it hits on some heavy and dark themes in a gentle and thoughtful way. It's a page-turner. I highly recommend it to all ages.
Check out all the comments below. So well received.

q
Quietday
Feb 14, 2017

This book was outstanding. It dealt with so many issues through the eyes of both parents and youth, and stayed interesting through the entire thing. I would highly recommend it for young adult readers. It causes you to reflect a lot about preconceived biases about people who are outside the norm and how we treat them. It reminds us that sometimes children are closer to the true heart of a situation than the adults around them, especially in instances like the bullying between Betty and Annabelle. How does one determine who is truthful and who is not? Sometimes people care more about confirming their own suspicions than justice.

JCLBeckyC Jan 17, 2017

Wow. This is one of those books where you finish reading the last line and then you want to flip back to the beginning to start reading it all over again. This historical fiction novel reads like a well-paced mystery while simultaneously consuming the reader with feelings of sorrow and joy like all the best literary fiction does. Don't let the fact that it's a "kids' book" keep you from reading it. I'd highly recommend this powerful story to anyone, especially fans of To Kill a Mockingbird. Readalike: The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley.

JCLChrisK Jan 12, 2017

"It happened in little bits, not all at once, and it wasn't easy to figure out what to do along the way."

From the very beginning--the short prologue, and even the cover of the hardback jacket--readers are told momentous things are coming. Something weighty and life-altering. As the story begins to gradually unfold, the foreshadowing continues with little comments like, "We would have been spared some trouble if we had not crossed paths that day." Even so, it all happens in little bits, not all at once, and when the full course of events is finally revealed it manages to shock and disturb in spite of the warnings. That's not to say that this is a dark or disturbing book, merely momentous and weighty.

This is a beautifully crafted book with as vivid a sense of place, time, and character as I've encountered. Readers come to fully know the story's setting and participants with an affecting clarity. Anabelle makes a wonderful narrator, and her carefully observed insights into herself and others provide a perfect perspective for understanding the tragedies at the heart of the story. She knows, by the end, that she has made a significant transition from childhood to adulthood. She knows far more about pain and suffering, and she knows far more about decency and kindness and community. The unfolding of that transition is transporting, meaningful, and moving. This is a story you feel.

A hauntingly beautiful and seemingly simple book about a small town, a bully, a lonesome war veteran, and a brave young girl with strong moral conviction. For those who love social justice, strong-willed characters, important settings, and books that examine the good and bad of humanity.

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Age

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cmlibrary_rkimray Aug 14, 2017

cmlibrary_rkimray thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 12 and 14

w
wombatcombat
Jul 20, 2017

wombatcombat thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and over

LibrarianDest Oct 07, 2016

LibrarianDest thinks this title is suitable for 9 years and over

Notices

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cmlibrary_rkimray Aug 14, 2017

Violence: Parents should know that the bully in this story is physically violent, causing a child to lose an eye and killing a quail in the woods. The ending also involves a death, which sensitive readers may not be prepared for.

r
red_cat_8498
Aug 21, 2016

Other: it can be upsetting in the end.For a 9 or 10 year old hard to digest death and an upsetting ending.

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