Doris

Doris

Music CD - 2013
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Publisher: New York, NY : Columbia Records, [2013]
Edition: Explicit version
Copyright Date: ℗2013
℗2013
Branch Call Number: RAP/HIPHOP CDH SWEA D S02
Characteristics: audio file,CD audio
digital,optical
1 audio disc (44 min.) : digital, CD audio ; 4 3/4 in

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lukasevansherman
Jul 17, 2015

Earl Sweatshirt emerged as part of the fun-loving, hell-raising, parent-enraging rap crew Odd Future. While the charismatic Tyler, the Creator was the most prominent member, Earl was arguably the most talented. Shortly after they achieved notoriety, he disappeared and later it was discovered he was put in boarding school in Samoa. He returned to the States and dropped his acclaimed debut album "Doris," which can take its place alongside albums by Chance the Rapper, Danny Brown, and Kendrick Lamar as examples of a new wave in hip-hop. He has a distinctive style and flow and favors slightly murky, stoned production. Guests include Tyler, Frank Ocean, Vince Staples, and Mac Millers and the Neptunes and RZA produce some tracks. 3.5 mics.

n
Nebula40
Sep 28, 2014

I checked out this CD after seeing it on a "Best of 2013" list. This is one of the worst albums I've heard in a long time. No lyrical or musical innovations here, only liberal use of the usual gangsta rap swear words against a backdrop of extremely mediocre music. I get that rap music is sometimes supposed to be out of the mainstream, but Earl Sweatshirt's only talent seems to be for retreading the same old gangsta rap clichés. I was very disappointed, given the high ratings the album received elsewhere.

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Santa Monica Staff Jan 04, 2014

Earl Sweatshirt has always seemed like the smartest smartass in Odd Future, but for a long time, it was hard to say for sure. By the time most people heard his gory cult-classic 2010 mixtape, Earl, the teen MC had already been shipped off to Samoa; since returning from boarding-school exile in 2012, he has remained relatively elusive. That makes this, his first full-length release since becoming famous, feel like a moment of truth: Was he really that great, or was it all some kind of mass hallucination?

Actually, he's even better. His rhyme schemes are as complex as ever, and these resolutely unpop beats – sticky-icky sample collages from producers including Pharrell, RZA and himself – are an ideal canvas. But his subject matter has undergone a drastic overhaul. Unlike some peers, Earl has figured out that shock value only goes so far. Doris' themes are way less cartoonish – getting stoned, shrugging off career pressures, staring down his least-favorite feelings. On "Chum," Earl admits to missing his estranged dad: "It's probably been 12 years since my father left/Left me fatherless/And I just used to say 'I hate him' in dishonest jest." It's one of many moments that hit harder than the imaginary violence that got the world's attention three years ago.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/doris-20130816#ixzz2pSko9PGm
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

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