Flour Water Salt Yeast

Flour Water Salt Yeast

The Fundamentals of Artisan Bread and Pizza

Book - 2012 | 1st ed
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mazinwhistler Jan 03, 2019

Great pizza dough recipes and pizza topping suggestions- well worth reading!

f
Firatcim
Oct 30, 2018

Great book for bread bakers, intermediate to advanced levels. I am seriously thinking of buying it. Tried many recipes and they all turned out great. I particularly love the hybrid and pizza dough recipes. However, be careful about the insane build for levain as well as his timing. Especially if you’re new to baking bread, do some research on freshloaf.com forums to get a sense of third party reviews from other experienced bakers.

s
sscha040
Oct 29, 2018

Loved this book so much that I went out and bought it! Tried several recipes and they all turned out great.

c
cameras4toys
Sep 04, 2018

I've been making the bread from this book for about 4 years. There are a few tricks that are not mentioned in the book that I have had to learn to make it all turn out without a mess.
#1 - if you don't have a proofing basket, use a tea towel, floured, in a bread basket or similar shaped bowl from your kitchen.
#2 - For breads that are not 100% white, make sure to give time for proofing before the bake, it may take longer sometimes due to a cold winters day.
#3 - To avoid burning the bottom of your bread, create an aluminum foil disc smashed into the bottom of the dutch over prior to pre-heating, this insulates a bit, reducing a blackened bottom.
#4 - To transfer the proofed bread into the searing hot dutch oven, flip it onto a square of parchment paper and lower the paper into the pot, cooking the bread with the paper.
#5 - Make sure your cuts (scores) are deep enough so the bread can expand in the oven.

c
crockas
May 13, 2018

I loved this book! I had never made bread before, and I am not really a "wing it" type of person. I want to know the how and why of everything before I begin, and this book has been an excellent starting place! It taught me the basics or how the ingredients interact with each other, the elements, time and temperature. I feel like I know enough now to be able to experiment to keep improving, and I have just landed myself a fun, tasty, and fairly inexpensive hobby! Thanks TPL.

a
ASG31
Jul 15, 2017

This is a great book for the more 'serious' bread maker who wants to know the 'why' as well as the 'how'. Understand the chemistry and you will consistently have amazing bread because you will know how to adjust your dough. Clear, thorough and precise. Read it as a book for all the theory and information, then start baking.

j
Jodi99
Feb 04, 2017

I learned to make yeasty breads back in the 70s. Lots of yeast and lots of kneading. This process is very different and I'm excited about it. Scant yeast, long ferment time, no kneading, a couple of folds and a lovely crusty yet moist bread.

This book has less recipes than Jeffrey Hamelman's Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes. That is a good thing when turning bread baking on its head as far as I was concerned. Ken's book was a good start, Jeffrey's book would be good for a reference. However, I would have rather Jeffrey have his measurements in grams than pounds and ounces for the home cook.

I used my Romertopf instead of a Dutch oven. Didn't soak it first, but did preheat with the oven. I'm sure I could have used any of my oven crockery (even my Tagine) with good results. Love the technique love the bread.

m
maroon_chicken
Jun 30, 2016

If you want to learn how to make good artisan bread intuitively or by a recipe, this is the book you should read.

c
Colina999
Mar 06, 2016

I really am enjoying this book, it really gives context for the process of bread making and what you're hoping to achieve. I Found the authors youtube videos helpful as well as this is my first time baking proper bread.

m
modestgoddess
Feb 13, 2016

Confess I haven't read this one, but it sounds like it would be easier to visit the Simply So Good website for the recipe, rather than wade through the wordiness:
http://www.simplysogood.com/2013/03/artisan-no-knead-bread.html
Super easy, foolproof recipe for crusty bread. Easy to add flavours, too.

l
Leatherbound
Feb 13, 2016

Wordy, incomplete .
If you want a better book for fundamentals, i recommend The Bread Bakers Apprentice .

s
sinbad64
Jan 17, 2014

Interesting recipes, but a tad wordy; needs to pare down instructions. Another flaw for the home baker: the number of Duch Ovens needed: two. The containers required for long term fermenting are enormous. So if you live is an average to smallish place, with a "normal" sized refrigerator, you will have to make modifications. Figuring out how to do half the recipe amounts would make all these manageable for someone working at home. And, oh yeah, you will have to figure out an appropriate time schedule, as the various concoctions take between 6-14 hours to be ready for the oven. Hopefully, after all this rigamarole, the results would be exceptionally tasty. Haven't tried any yet.

q
Quetzlzacatenango
Dec 01, 2012

Focused on straight bread, this book contains some alternate methods for developing and baking bread in a dutch oven to produce a more caramelized crust. There's no enriched doughs here or fancy forming techniques just good flavored unenriched breads (and pizza crusts) with a strong section of levain bread. The author raves about his croissants and pain au chocolat but doesn't include the recipes.The method used here is easy but lengthy and I really don't care for proofing then turning the loaf out and then placing in the dutch oven (too much handling) but you can't argue with results. The loaf was flavorful with nice uneven holes with a crust that sings when taken out of the oven

s
sdelao
Oct 24, 2012

Really enjoyed this book. Give it a read if you enjoy bread as much as I do!


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